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Clinician’s Corner: Facilitating Posttraumatic Growth Through Participation in a ‎Speakers’ Collective: Clinical Implications for Supporting the Survivor’s Mission‎
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/30/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Communities Healing and Transforming Trauma (CHATT) is a speakers’ collective developed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Trauma Recovery Center (TRC). The UCSF TRC was founded in 2001 to test a new model of comprehensive services for victims of crime that integrates assertive outreach, clinical case management and trauma-informed, evidence-based mental health services. TRC also provides coordination, advocacy and linkage to help survivors navigate complex systems and access the resources they need to heal, including medical, legal and other services. It was developed as an alternative to the claims-based crime victim compensation model that was not accessible for the majority of victims, and it was initially funded as a pilot program by state legislation for five years.
Developmental Traumatology: Complex Trauma, Social Pragmatic Communication, and the Speech, Language, Hearing Scientist
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/30/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
I have worked as a speech, language and hearing (SLH) scientist for 37 years, a discipline traditionally referred to speech-language pathology, but “pathology” implies an ableist perspective (Nielsen, 2021), prompting my use of a different nomenclature. Over these years, I have worked with children who have histories of maltreatment and suffered from complex trauma. Complex trauma is the exposure to, encounters with and long-term impacts of experiences in the caregiving system that leave the child feeling helpless, a loss of safety, and overwhelmed (National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2014).
How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted patients receiving PTSD care?
Date posted: 08/16/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
One of the biggest changes to the mental health landscape since the onset of the pandemic has been the rapid and wide-scale switch from in-person therapy to telehealth. The adoption of telehealth may represent a silver lining to the pandemic, insofar as telehealth can increase the availability and convenience of psychotherapy. Born out of necessity to maintain physical distancing imperatives, this shift is likely to be permanent for at least some portion of mental health care provision. 
Shame Mediates Emotion Dysregulation and PTSD Symptoms in Combat Veterans
Date posted: 08/30/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most prevalent mental health disorders among US veterans and is associated with emotion dysregulation. Improvements in emotion dysregulation have corresponded with reductions in PTSD symptoms. However, it is unclear if specific emotions play a role in this relationship. 
Biological Perspectives: Psychedelic Drugs for the Treatment of Trauma-Related Disorders
StressPoints
Date posted: 07/23/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Psychedelic drugs, including but not limited to psilocybin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), methylenedioxy-methylamphetamine (MDMA), peyote and dimethyltryptamine (DMT), are currently classified by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as Schedule 1 controlled substances. This implies that there is no current medical use and there exists a high potential for abuse (DEA, 2021). However, LSD has been of interest to molecular psychiatry for the past 70 years, as its chemical structure is similar to serotonin (5-HT; Tupper et al., 2015). Recently, there has been increased attention on the potential for psychedelic drug treatment of various neuropsychiatric syndromes. Specifically, a growing body of literature suggests utility in the context of trauma- and stressor-related disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Mithoefer et al., 2016). 
Clinician’s Corner: The Transcending Trauma Project, Part II: ‎A Systemic Perspective Of Coping and Adaptation: The Inextricable Connection Between ‎Individual and Family
StressPoints
Date posted: 07/29/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
As discussed in the last issue of ISTSS StressPoints’ Clinician’s Corner column, in 1993, the Transcending Trauma Project (TTP) was launched under the auspices of the Council for Relationships, affiliated with Jefferson University, and located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It was based on grounded theory methodology to gain an understanding of how Holocaust survivors coped with and managed to rebuild their lives after the devastating suffering, deprivation and losses experienced during the genocide of the Nazi Holocaust designed to exterminate the Jewish population of Europe. To expand the focus beyond the individual survivor and to apply systemic analysis to the study of coping and adaptation after extreme trauma, TTP not only analyzed the individual survivor as a single unit but also analyzed the individual survivor within their family unit.
MDMA-Assisted Therapy can improve Sleep Quality in PTSD
Date posted: 06/14/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Recent advances in sleep research have shown that overall sleep quality is associated with a person’s physical and mental wellbeing (Tahmasian et al., 2020). As such, sleep disturbances are a common feature of many mental disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in which people often suffer from recurrent nightmares and insomnia (Krystal, 2013).
Clinician's Corner: The Transcending Trauma Project, Part I: A Systemic Perspective Of Coping And ‎Adaptation: The Inextricable Connection Between Individual And Family
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/27/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Through the 1990s, the field of trauma studies focused almost exclusively on the negative sequelae of traumatic experiences. After extensive reading in the field of trauma and Holocaust studies, the Transcending Trauma study group found this to be untrue in our clinical practices and in our life experiences with survivors of the Holocaust. The team decided to address the absence of a fuller understanding of trauma’s impact—especially extreme trauma—by conducting an expanded qualitative interview-based research project with survivors of the Nazi Holocaust during World War II and their family members in the hope of gathering evidence for the development of a psychological conceptualization of how individuals and families cope differently with extreme trauma and how they rebuild their lives.
Comparative Efficacy of Commonly Used Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Clinical Protocols for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression
Date posted: 05/17/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent among US Military Veterans and is often accompanied by major depressive disorder  (Magruder et al., 2005). These disorders can significantly impact the social functioning, employment, and even physical health of Veterans (Kessler, 2000; Shalev et al., 2017). While medications and therapies have proven efficacious for the treatment of PTSD, many who undergo these treatments continue to experience symptoms and side effects (Watts et al., 2013). Increasingly, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is being used to augment standard treatment. 
 
SIG Spotlight: Psychodynamic Research and Practice Special Interest Group
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/27/2021
Topic: Clinical Issues and Treatment
Modern concepts and treatments of psychological trauma are inextricably linked with the history of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic psychotherapy. Josef Breuer and Sigmund Freud’s first major psychoanalytic text, Studies on Hysteria (1895) is the fountainhead of modern psychotherapy and centers on the hypothesis that many patients “… suffer mainly from reminiscences” of traumatic events. Although Breuer and Freud agreed that their patients could neither fully remember nor ever forget these wrenching experiences, they could not agree on why this was so. Instead, they framed fundamental questions about the nature of trauma, dissociation, conversion (a term which they coined for the Studies), the biological and psychological bases for intrusive memories, and the process of recovery which ISTSS members continue to study and debate today.
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