ISTSS Logo
 
Home > Public Resources > Trauma Blog > 2001 - Winter > Awards and Acknowledgments Presented in San Antonio, Ursano Receives ISTSS Lifetime Achievement Awar

Awards and Acknowledgments Presented in San Antonio, Ursano Receives ISTSS Lifetime Achievement Award

January 1, 2001

The 2000 Lifetime Achievement Award, the highest honor given by ISTSS, went to Robert Ursano for outstanding and fundamental contributions to the field of traumatic stress studies. Ursano is professor of psychiatry and neuroscience and chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland. Ursano is widely published in the areas of posttraumatic stress disorder, military psychiatry and the psychological effects of combat, trauma and disasters.

The awards ceremony held at the 16th annual meeting in San Antonio last November opened with Past President John Fairbank offering a special welcome to first-time attendees and new members among the 300 people in attendance.

Fairbank recognized ISTSS past presidents, presidents of affiliate societies, members of the 2000 Executive Committee, outgoing board members and 16th annual meeting Program Chair Juesta Caddell and deputies. Fairbank also acknowledged exhibitors and conference sponsors, Pfizer, SmithKline Beeham, Janssen, Sheppard Pratt and Haworth Press.

Lisa M. Shin was awarded the Chaim Danieli Young Professional Award, which recognizes excellence in science or research in the field of traumatic stress by an individual who has completed training within the past five years. The award was instituted by Yael Danieli in memory of her father. Shin, an assistant professor with the Department of Psychology at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, has been widely published in professional journals and books and has presented many papers and posters.

David W. Foy received the Robert S. Laufer Memorial Award for Outstanding Scientific Achievement, which is given to an individual or group that has made an outstanding contribution to research in the PTSD field. Ellen Frey-Wouters, PhD, established this award in memory of her husband, Robert S. Laufer. Author of a number of books, Foy is professor of psychology, Graduate School of Education and Psychology, Pepperdine University; adjunct professor of psychology, Headington Program in International Trauma, Fuller Theological Seminary; and senior research consultant, National Center for PTSD, Menlo Park Division.

The Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence was presented to Medecins sans Frontieres/Doctors without Borders for outstanding work done in Bosnia-Hercegovina. This award is given to a clinician in direct service to traumatized individuals and whose written and/or verbal communications to the field exemplify the work of Sarah Haley.

Migael Scherer, director of the Dart Award for Excellence in Reporting on Victims of Violence, announced the 2000 Dart Award winner. The Roanoke Times, Roanoke, Virginia, won for "Who Killed John McCloskey?" a five-part series that took an in-depth look at the suspicious death of an 18-year-old who was arrested and later placed in a mental institution.

Danny Kaloupek announced winners for the new Student Grant Award, received by Michaela Mendelsohn from the University of North Texas, and Jodie Ambrosino from Yeshiva University. Both are doctoral students in psychology.

Another new award was given at the beginning of the poster reception the day after the awards banquet. Amy Busch received first place in the Student Poster Award for her poster, "Women Arrested for Domestic Violence: A Comparison with Male Batterers." Second place went to Iris Engelherd, third place to M. Lori Conrad and honorable mention to Renee Dominquez.