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The importance of personality in the development of PTSD in firefighters
Date posted: 12/6/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Fire fighters routinely risk their lives to protect the public. Over 1 million fire fighters in the United States alone sign up for this dangerous profession to protect people, wildlands, and property despite known threats to their healthy, safety, and wellbeing. While our prior research points to remarkable levels of resilience in this population given their enormous exposure to a variety of traumatic experiences (Gulliver et al., in press), a minority of fire fighters do develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or related mental health problems. This points toward the presence of individual-level risk factors that drives this variability in responses to traumatic events. 
Clinician's Corner: A Two-Pronged Approach and Real-World Case Example to Assessing Secondary Traumatic Stress
StressPoints
Date posted: 11/24/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
The research literature is replete with data demonstrating that professionals who work with clients experiencing traumatic stress symptoms are at risk of developing their own trauma responses, particularly if they have potent indirect exposure to distressing trauma details (Henzel, Ruiz, Finney et al., 2015). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) identifies repeated and extreme indirect trauma exposure as a qualifying Criterion A event for consideration of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in professionals. Despite its clear framing as a clinical syndrome, best practice recommendations for addressing secondary traumatic stress in the literature have historically fallen into the domains of self-care, wellness and health promotion, with little application of evidence-based trauma interventions to the problem of secondary traumatic stress in practice (Molnar, Sprang, Killian, et al., 2017).
Media Matters: Trauma at our Fingertips: Understanding the Psychological Impact of Graphic Media Coverage
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/24/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
It has never been easier to record—or even live stream—graphic events up close and share them with the world. While the existence of both smartphones and the internet has allowed the world to be more connected than ever before, we may also be at risk for greater exposure to disturbing images and videos (Holman et al., 2020). One may thus begin to wonder how frequent consumption of such graphic images impacts our mental health. Some studies have shown, perhaps unsurprisingly, positive associations between the amount of exposure to media coverage of violence and subsequent psychological distress (e.g., posttraumatic stress symptoms; Holman et al., 2020; Silver et al., 2013). 
SIG Spotlight: The Traumatic Loss and Grief SIG
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/24/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Widespread unmet needs arising from deaths due to the opioid, suicide, homicide, AIDS, COVID-19 and other epidemics are being met by an opportunity to make major strides in raising the standard of bereavement care worldwide. For the past three years, Drs. Robert Pynoos and the Traumatic Loss and Grief SIG Co-Chairs, Drs. Christopher Layne and Julie Kaplow, have been working with the American Psychiatric Association (APA) to formulate developmentally informed criteria for a new grief disorder in DSM-5-TR.
Clinician's Corner: Recognizing Traumatic Brain Injury Among Survivors of Intimate Partner Abuse
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/4/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have been called the signature injury suffered by veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and have been singled out as a risk factor for the development of dementing disease among world-class athletes.
 
Using Latent Class Analysis to Support ICD-11 Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis in a Sample of Homeless Adults
Date posted: 06/26/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) is a new diagnosis that recognises that different types of traumatic experiences can impact individuals in ways that the more established diagnosis of PTSD does not capture (World Health Organization, 2018: WHO). The distinction might best be conveyed by considering the way an individual could internalise the experience of surviving a serious car accident, or terrorist attack, with the way another individual internalises repetitive childhood sexual abuse. We investigated the CPTSD model with a group of people who have experienced homelessness and trauma in Australia.
Making PTSD Screening More Likely by Identifying Abbreviated Versions of the PCL-5
Date posted: 05/9/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Life after a traumatic injury can be scary and stressful. Beyond the general stressful life disruptions and uncertainties, there are often numerous follow-up appointments for the patient, such as physical rehabilitation, wound care, and pain management. There are also numerous professions with different goals involved in the care for the patient during this time, including surgeons, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, social workers, as well as mental health professionals.
Worst life events and media exposure to terrorism
Date posted: 05/9/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics

Unfortunately, all people are likely to have something bad happen to them over the course of their lifetimes. Our team of researchers at the University of California, Irvine was interested in how people consider and catalog their various life events, including both direct, individually-experienced events and indirect, collectively-experienced ones, to determine which is their “worst” life event.

How to Predict and Mitigate Risk of Evacuation of US Service Members from Deployed Settings for Behavioral Health Reasons
Date posted: 04/21/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Acute behavioral health crises are one of the leading causes of medical evacuation from combat operations for American service members (Williams, Stahlman, & Oh, 2017), and evacuees with psychiatric disorders are less likely to return to duty (Cohen, et al., 2010). We set out to determine variables that may help predict which service members are more likely to be medically evacuated from theater for behavioral health concerns.
Research Methods: Using Big Data to Study Responses to Collective Trauma
StressPoints
Date posted: 02/26/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Studying large-scale traumatic events is difficult, given the unpredictability of such events and the resources needed to mobilize in their aftermath to conduct sound research (Jones, Wojcik, Sweeting, & Silver, 2016; Silver, 2004). However, big social media data on Twitter offer a multitude of ways to study people in stressful contexts that avoid many of the practical and methodological challenges associated with this work.
Displaying results 1-10 (of 33)
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