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Media Matters: Trauma at our Fingertips: Understanding the Psychological Impact of Graphic Media Coverage
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/24/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
It has never been easier to record—or even live stream—graphic events up close and share them with the world. While the existence of both smartphones and the internet has allowed the world to be more connected than ever before, we may also be at risk for greater exposure to disturbing images and videos (Holman et al., 2020). One may thus begin to wonder how frequent consumption of such graphic images impacts our mental health. Some studies have shown, perhaps unsurprisingly, positive associations between the amount of exposure to media coverage of violence and subsequent psychological distress (e.g., posttraumatic stress symptoms; Holman et al., 2020; Silver et al., 2013). 
SIG Spotlight: The Traumatic Loss and Grief SIG
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/24/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Widespread unmet needs arising from deaths due to the opioid, suicide, homicide, AIDS, COVID-19 and other epidemics are being met by an opportunity to make major strides in raising the standard of bereavement care worldwide. For the past three years, Drs. Robert Pynoos and the Traumatic Loss and Grief SIG Co-Chairs, Drs. Christopher Layne and Julie Kaplow, have been working with the American Psychiatric Association (APA) to formulate developmentally informed criteria for a new grief disorder in DSM-5-TR.
Clinician's Corner: Recognizing Traumatic Brain Injury Among Survivors of Intimate Partner Abuse
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/4/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have been called the signature injury suffered by veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and have been singled out as a risk factor for the development of dementing disease among world-class athletes.
 
Using Latent Class Analysis to Support ICD-11 Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis in a Sample of Homeless Adults
Date posted: 06/26/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) is a new diagnosis that recognises that different types of traumatic experiences can impact individuals in ways that the more established diagnosis of PTSD does not capture (World Health Organization, 2018: WHO). The distinction might best be conveyed by considering the way an individual could internalise the experience of surviving a serious car accident, or terrorist attack, with the way another individual internalises repetitive childhood sexual abuse. We investigated the CPTSD model with a group of people who have experienced homelessness and trauma in Australia.
Making PTSD Screening More Likely by Identifying Abbreviated Versions of the PCL-5
Date posted: 05/9/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Life after a traumatic injury can be scary and stressful. Beyond the general stressful life disruptions and uncertainties, there are often numerous follow-up appointments for the patient, such as physical rehabilitation, wound care, and pain management. There are also numerous professions with different goals involved in the care for the patient during this time, including surgeons, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, social workers, as well as mental health professionals.
Worst life events and media exposure to terrorism
Date posted: 05/9/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics

Unfortunately, all people are likely to have something bad happen to them over the course of their lifetimes. Our team of researchers at the University of California, Irvine was interested in how people consider and catalog their various life events, including both direct, individually-experienced events and indirect, collectively-experienced ones, to determine which is their “worst” life event.

How to Predict and Mitigate Risk of Evacuation of US Service Members from Deployed Settings for Behavioral Health Reasons
Date posted: 04/21/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Acute behavioral health crises are one of the leading causes of medical evacuation from combat operations for American service members (Williams, Stahlman, & Oh, 2017), and evacuees with psychiatric disorders are less likely to return to duty (Cohen, et al., 2010). We set out to determine variables that may help predict which service members are more likely to be medically evacuated from theater for behavioral health concerns.
Research Methods: Using Big Data to Study Responses to Collective Trauma
StressPoints
Date posted: 02/26/2020
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics
Studying large-scale traumatic events is difficult, given the unpredictability of such events and the resources needed to mobilize in their aftermath to conduct sound research (Jones, Wojcik, Sweeting, & Silver, 2016; Silver, 2004). However, big social media data on Twitter offer a multitude of ways to study people in stressful contexts that avoid many of the practical and methodological challenges associated with this work.
Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Still Going Strong After All These Years
Date posted: 12/24/2019
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is inherently complex, encompassing symptoms that reflect a biopsychosocial interplay of physiology, emotion, cognition, motivation, behavior, relationships, and identity that occur when survival is threatened or irreparable harm is inflicted. Although it has been argued that a variant, complex PTSD (CPTSD), is unnecessary, and despite CPTSD not being included in the American Psychiatric Association’s in the DSM-IV and DSM-5, CPTSD just keeps hanging around and won’t go away.

Asserting the Construct Validity of the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) measurement instrument
Date posted: 10/1/2019
Topic: Assessment and Psychometrics

Clinicians who work with traumatized individuals often find positive meaning in their work and yet a high percentage of them remain vulnerable to burnout or traumatic stress. For this reason, many scientists have sought to develop scales to help them and others assess symptoms.

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