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Do Gender Differences in Prescribing among Veterans with PTSD still Exist?
Date posted: 08/26/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
Women veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have historically received more psychiatric medications relative to males. Even with increased rates of PTSD and greater numbers of comorbidities, these differences do not account for the gender differences observed in prescribing. 
Considerations for treating military-affiliated patients for PTSD in community clinics
Date posted: 05/9/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
Globally, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant mental health issue among military service members and veterans. Within the US, around 13% of veterans have a PTSD diagnosis, with the prevalence of PTSD increasing significantly post-9/11 with conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in about 11-20 out of every 100 Veterans having PTSD.
 
Military Matters: Talking Later: ‎Veteran’s Stories of Late-Life ‎Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/24/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
A vast majority of older veterans (93%) report exposure to at least one potentially traumatic event during their lifetime1. Some develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, most do not, as the prevalence of PTSD in later adulthood is low2. Around 10% of older veterans experience PTSD later in life1. PTSD is a mental health condition that can occur in the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event and includes symptoms that fall into four clusters: intrusive memories, avoidance of reminders, negative alterations in cognition and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity3
Risk and Resilience: Revictimization among US Military Veterans
Date posted: 04/1/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
Individuals who have experienced abuse in childhood have a heightened risk of being victimized again in adulthood. Revictimization has been associated with negative physical and mental health outcomes. Our study aimed to identify factors related to revictimization over time in a group of US military veteran men and women. Identifying risk and protective factors can aid in prevention and intervention work with veterans.
VA study helps us understand Vietnam Theater Veterans’ mental health
Date posted: 04/5/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
Since the 1980’s, major epidemiological studies have been conducted to understand the mental health effects Vietnam War service.  Results from earlier large-scale studies have shown that the war has had negative effects on veterans’ mental health. Through VA’s 2016-2017 Vietnam Era Health Retrospective Observational Study (VE-HEROeS), the first nationwide survey of Vietnam War veterans’ physical and mental health  in over 30 years was conducted. 
Military Matters: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Transgender Care: Clinical Considerations ‎for Mental Health Providers
StressPoints
Date posted: 03/31/2022
Topic: Military and Combat
For decades, transgender individuals in the United States have faced discriminatory policies that bar them from serving openly in the U.S. military under their self-identified gender and hinder their ability to feel accepted among fellow veterans. These individuals are at an increased risk of experiencing discrimination (Harrison-Quintana & Herman, 2013), sexual trauma (Beckman et. al., 2018), and negative mental health outcomes such as suicidality, depression, and substance use (Blosnich et. al., 2013; Frost et. al., 2021). The most recent ban on transgender service members openly serving, which was lifted and reinstated several times since 2016, is representative of the vacillating support transgender individuals have encountered. Nonetheless, these individuals are two to three times more likely to serve than their cisgender counterparts (Harrison-Quintana & Herman, 2013) and the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has become one of the larger providers of LGBTQ+ health care in the U.S. (Kauth & Shipherd, 2016) – statistics that highlight the need for transgender care that is inclusive, compassionate, and that takes into consideration the nuanced experiences of transgender veterans.
Military Matters: The Other Battle Borne by Female Veterans
StressPoints
Date posted: 12/2/2021
Topic: Military and Combat
On March 4, 1865, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln made a commitment to veterans, "To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan." In Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals across the United States, these words have welcomed veterans. For military service members returning to civilian life, the words can evoke a sense of belonging and homecoming to something greater than themselves. Some years ago, as an honorably discharged female Airman, I walked past these words when I sought treatment at my local VA. Except I did not feel a sense of belonging or homecoming. Instead, I felt an all-too-familiar sting of invalidation and rejection. These words did not welcome me; they welcomed "him." Thousands of women veterans walk past these words every day, enduring a small slight in the larger struggle to be acknowledged.
Military Matters: The Importance of Brief Trauma-Focused Treatment within Substance Use ‎Disorder Specialty Care: Written Exposure Therapy (WET)‎
StressPoints
Date posted: 09/30/2021
Topic: Military and Combat
There are high rates of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among treatment-seeking veterans with substance use disorders (SUD). The process of re-integrating into the civilian world while coping with psychological and physical conditions may increase the likelihood that veterans will develop substance problems.1,2 Comorbid PTSD contributes to poor SUD treatment outcomes and is associated with worse overall mental and physical health, including high rates of suicide and higher rates of relapse to alcohol and drugs.2,3
Shame Mediates Emotion Dysregulation and PTSD Symptoms in Combat Veterans
Date posted: 08/30/2021
Topic: Military and Combat
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most prevalent mental health disorders among US veterans and is associated with emotion dysregulation. Improvements in emotion dysregulation have corresponded with reductions in PTSD symptoms. However, it is unclear if specific emotions play a role in this relationship. 
SIG Spotlight: Military Women and Mental Health: Risk Factors and Implications for ‎Treatment
StressPoints
Date posted: 07/23/2021
Topic: Military and Combat
It has been a ground-breaking year for women serving in the military. In the U.S., the Marine Corps Recruiting Depot in San Diego welcomed its first female platoon (Athey, 2020) and President Biden appointed two female generals to lead Transportation and Southern Command (Hoffman & Starr, 2021). Outside of the U.S., Officer Cadets Chuki Wangmo, Midya Masti and Firushana Thaufeeq were the first women from Bhutan, the Kurdistan region of Iraq, and the Maldives to graduate from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (Forces Net, 2021b). Additionally, Major General Sharon Nesmith became the first female Army Officer in the U.K. to serve at the division level (Forces Net, 2021a). To honor this progress and recognize the mental health needs of women in the military, the ISTSS Military Special Interest Group offers this   brief overview of gender differences in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and treatment within the field of military psychology.
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