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Enhancing Social Support May Improve Cognitive Processing Therapy Outcomes in Telemedicine for PTSD
Date posted: 07/13/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Telehealth-based delivery of gold-standard posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatments such as Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT; Resick et al., 2017) has been shown to be no less effective than in-person delivery of care (Morland et al., 2014, 2015). Yet providers may be curious about what might improve outcomes. Malleable characteristics, such as the amount of social support an individual perceives they have, are of special interest. Although some research has shown social support can encourage greater reductions in PTSD symptoms (Price et al., 2018), individuals living in rural areas might have important differences. Therefore, we set out to evaluate whether pre-existing perceived social support could enhance the effects of CPT for rural American military veterans participating in a pragmatic randomized effectiveness trial of telehealth-based collaborative care for PTSD (Fortney et al., 2015).
Implementation Patterns of Two Evidence‐Based Psychotherapies in Veterans Affairs Residential PTSD Programs: A Five‐Point Longitudinal National Investigation
Date posted: 07/14/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
The present study examined the patterns of adoption of two evidence‐based psychotherapies—prolonged exposure (PE) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT)—in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs residential posttraumatic stress disorder treatment programs. Evaluation of adoption patterns over time suggested that CPT was used in more programs and with more patients within programs compared to PE. Strategies to improve sustainability measurement and implications for implementation science are discussed.
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Justice Involvement Among Military Veterans
Date posted: 07/17/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Military veterans are at an increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to combat exposure and other traumatic military experiences (Xue et al, 2015). PTSD has been linked with criminal justice involvement including being arrested or incarcerated (Anderson, Geier, & Cahill, 2016; Elbogen et al., 2012; Sherman, Fostick, & Zohar, 2014). Understanding the association between PTSD and criminal justice involvement, as well as the strengths and limitations of the studies examining this association, will aid clinicians and healthcare systems that serve military veterans.
What symptoms of PTSD remain after integrated treatment for PTSD and alcohol use disorder?
Date posted: 07/21/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Trauma-focused treatments are effective in reducing overall symptoms of PTSD. Previous studies have shown that some symptoms remain after treatment, even in people who don’t have a diagnosis of PTSD any longer. However, no studies have examined residual symptoms of PTSD in those with a co-morbid alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnosis. We set out to understand whether there are differences in the likelihood of individual symptoms of PTSD or AUD persisting between two types of integrated psychotherapy for PTSD/AUD.
What works to treat trauma-related guilt in patients with PTSD and substance use disorders?
Date posted: 07/24/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Patients diagnosed with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) endorse more severe PTSD symptoms, more suicidal ideation, and more impairments than patients with either disorder alone.  Guilt, a common response to trauma, can make treatment for these patients more complicated because guilt is also linked to more severe symptoms and worse treatment outcomes. Our study compared changes in trauma-related guilt in an integrated PTSD+SUD trauma-focused treatment (Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure; COPE) with an integrated present centered therapy that was not trauma-focused (Seeking Safety).
Military Matters: The Mental Health and Service Utilization Among Reserve and National Guard Forces Study: A Summary of Key Findings
StressPoints
Date posted: 05/4/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
The reserve component of the United States military plays an important role in national defense, accounting for approximately 40% of deployed forces in recent conflicts (Tanielian & Jaycox, 2008). Currently, the reserves represent 53% of the total Army population, yet there is relatively little research examining mental health problems among reserve personnel (Vogt, et al., 2008).
Trauma and Diversity: Moral Injury Among Justice-Involved Veterans: An Understudied Clinical Concern
Date posted: 05/4/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
While the concept of moral injury has existed for years, moral injury has received increased empirical attention over the past decade. Many definitions of moral injury exist; however, one of the most commonly used is by Litz and colleagues (2009) who define moral injury as “perpetrating, failing to prevent, bearing witness to, or learning about acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations.”
Death Notification: Challenges for Health Care Providers and Other Professionals
Date posted: 04/4/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Although the phrase, death is a part of life, is commonly stated, discussions about death and informing those who are impacted by it remain uncomfortable topics for professionals. Recently, researchers at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress created an informational guide titled Notifying Family Members After Unexpected Deaths: Guidelines for Healthcare Providers that is readily available online:
How to Predict and Mitigate Risk of Evacuation of US Service Members from Deployed Settings for Behavioral Health Reasons
Date posted: 04/21/2020
Topic: Military and Combat
Acute behavioral health crises are one of the leading causes of medical evacuation from combat operations for American service members (Williams, Stahlman, & Oh, 2017), and evacuees with psychiatric disorders are less likely to return to duty (Cohen, et al., 2010). We set out to determine variables that may help predict which service members are more likely to be medically evacuated from theater for behavioral health concerns.
Comparison between Women-Only and Mixed-Gender Intensive PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans
Date posted: 08/2/2019
Topic: Military and Combat
Women veterans diagnosed with PTSD are an especially rapidly growing subgroup of VHA patients (Washington, Davis, Der-Martirosian, & Yano, 2013), constituting 10.3% of all those diagnosed with PTSD in 2015. With the recognition that women veterans with PTSD have often experienced different types of trauma and have different needs than men, specialized intensive treatment is also offered in two specialized intensive Women’s Treatment Rehabilitation Programs (Karlin et al., 2010).
Displaying results 1-10 (of 34)
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